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Spectrum of Peacework

Topic

3rd Party Nonviolent Intervention icon3rd Party Nonviolent Intervention

Language

English

Type

Training Tool
Goal
  • to expand participant’s cognitive framework for third-party nonviolent intervention;
  • to distinguish TPNI from other forms of peacework (peacebuilding/peacemaking).
Time

40-60 minutes

How to Lead

Spectrum of Peacebuilding is a series of exercises to examine the various modes of peacework and how third-party nonviolent intervention (TPNI) is different. The steps:

STEP 1: BRAINSTORM MODES OF PEACEWORK

Have participants brainstorm modes of peacework (such as Nonviolent Direct Action, Humanitarian Assistance, etc.). Keep the list small – connecting modes of peacework when appropriate (such as “direct food service” and “offering medical supplies” both fall under a general category of humanitarian assistance). (If TPNI is not on the list, that’s fine.)

STEP 2: BREAK INTO SMALL GROUPS AROUND THE VARIOUS MODES

With the list, have all the participants break into small groups (4 to 6) around the room via the various modes listed. So in one corner might be the Direct Action group, another corner the Humanitarian group, another corner the Military Peacekeeping group, and so on.

STEP 3: HAVE EACH GROUP CREATE AND PRESENT A SCULPTURE ON THEIR FORM OF PEACEWORK

Give each group a few minutes to create a sculpture with their bodies that would visually capture their form of peacework and how it operates. The sculpture should be some strong image made by every member of the group demonstrating and showing the form of peacework. (While participants are working on their sculpture, you can put up the three signs for Peacekeeping, Peacebuilding and Peacemaking around the room – see below.)

After each group has designed their sculpture, bring the group together and have each group present their sculpture/image. (Encourage lots of support for other groups to keep it lively!) Briefly debrief for the characteristics of that mode of peacework based on the image.

STEP 4: IN THEIR GROUP, HAVE GROUPS IDENTIFY WHICH OF THE THREE FORMS OF PEACEWORK THEY MOSTLY FALL INTO (PEACEKEEPING, PEACEBUILDING, PEACEMAKING)

Have participants stay in their sculpture groups. While people are in those small groups, verbally give a generalization of the three different forms of peacework (peacebuilding, peacekeeping, peacemaking). Have participants move with their small groups to the sign of the peacework they think they fit into.

After participants have identified which form they believe they fit into, give participants more information on the three types of peacework Have participants read through and decide if they belong in a different place or if they should stay in the same place. Debrief, helping people understand the theoretical differences of the three applications.

STEP 5: DEBRIEFING

After that is completed, have groups look at the various places of the modes of peacework. Then have the group look at TPNI in particular, placing it within civilian peacekeeping. This should include lots of stories and clarifications around what TPNI work is and how it is different/similar from other modes of peacework.

Most peace work in the world is either peacebuilding or peacemaking. Since peacekeeping is new (and what TPNI is all about), help participants note the difference and help them understand what some of the implications may be (for example raising the future conversation about nonpartisanship, relationship to justice-oriented groups, etc). Point out that this is a model they may relate to in the field, since it is widely known and used as a reference point among humanitarians and military. When communicating to military or the United Nations, it’s helpful for participants to know this language to be able to make use of it.

Where This Tool Comes From

Designed by Daniel Hunter and George Lakey, Training for Change (PO Box 30914, Philadelphia, PA 19104): www.TrainingForChange.org * info@trainingforchange.orgwith design ideas from Lisa Schirch, Eastern Mennonite University, schirchl@emu.edu.

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